Scientists learn red grouper operate as underwater architects

(Video still Courtesy Florida State University) By Juliet Eilperin Washington Post Staff WriterMonday, March 8, 2010 Red grouper are known for a few key characteristics — their hue, which can range from pink to bright orange; their tastiness, whether they’re grilled or sautéed; and their predation method, in which they ambush fellow sea creatures and … Continue reading Scientists learn red grouper operate as underwater architects

Cancer Kills Many Sea Lions, and Its Cause Remains a Mystery

Dr. Frances Gulland and Dr. Bill Van Bonn performing an autopsy on a young sea lion on Feb. 23 at the Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, Calif. (Photo: Heidi Schumann for The New York Times) The New York TimesBy: Ingfei ChenPublished: March 4, 2010 For 14 years, since they first reported that a disturbing proportion … Continue reading Cancer Kills Many Sea Lions, and Its Cause Remains a Mystery

Ancient Corals Hold New Hope for Reefs

Huon Peninsula raised reef terraces. (Credit: Photo by John Pandolfi) ScienceDaily (Mar. 2, 2010) Fossil corals, up to half a million years old, are providing fresh hope that coral reefs may be able to withstand the huge stresses imposed on them by today’s human activity. Reef ecosystems were able to persist through massive environmental changes … Continue reading Ancient Corals Hold New Hope for Reefs

Vast Iceberg Dislodged in Antarctic Collision

The new iceberg and the tongue of the Mertz Glacier (Photo © Australian Antarctic Division) Environment News ServiceHOBART, Tasmania, Australia, February 26, 2010 A massive iceberg has broken away from the Mertz Glacier in the Australian Antarctic Territory after another enormous iceberg, B9B, collided with the tongue of the glacier, a joint Australian- French study … Continue reading Vast Iceberg Dislodged in Antarctic Collision