White House Says Gulf Drilling Ban Hasn’t Hurt Jobs

By Jared A. FavoleThe Wall Street JournalSeptember 16, 2010 The Obama administration said Thursday that a six-month moratorium on offshore oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico has had a limited effect on employment despite concerns the ban would cripple coastal economies. The number of workers with jobs in the five Louisiana parishes that support … Continue reading White House Says Gulf Drilling Ban Hasn’t Hurt Jobs

Coral Disease Outbreaks Linked To Winter Temperatures, Not Just Warm Summers

NOAASeptember 16, 2010 For the first time, scientists have linked mild water temperatures during the preceding winter period with outbreaks of coral diseases on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. By studying satellite measurements of unusual sea surface temperatures, the international team of scientists also examined the magnitude of stress upon corals from unusually warm temperatures, particularly … Continue reading Coral Disease Outbreaks Linked To Winter Temperatures, Not Just Warm Summers

Gulf oil spill: After it hit beaches, where did it go?

Birds roam the shore after a rainstorm in Grande Isle, La. The beach was reopened to the public in early August, having been closed in the aftermath of the Gulf oil spill. Photo Credit: Gerald Herbert/AP On a morning stroll down the serene beaches of Grand Isle State Park, a visitor can watch as waves … Continue reading Gulf oil spill: After it hit beaches, where did it go?

World pays high price for overfishing, studies say

A fisher sells salmon from his boat in Steveston,British Columbia September 1, 2010.Photo Credit: Andy Clark/Reuters By: Allan DowdReuters, September 14, 2010 Decades of overfishing have deprived the food industry of billions of dollars in revenue and the world of fish that could have helped feed undernourished countries, according to a series of studies released … Continue reading World pays high price for overfishing, studies say

Opinion: Deep sea fishing is ‘oceanocide’

Glowing Sucker Octopus – Up to 50 cm long, light passes through theinternal organs of these deep sea-dwelling octopigiving them a diaphanous, luminous appearance. Photo Credit: Claire Nouvain By Claire NouvianCNN, September 13 2010 Fewer than 300 boats in the world are destroying the deep sea, the largest reservoir of biodiversity on Earth. They are … Continue reading Opinion: Deep sea fishing is ‘oceanocide’

U.S. and Cuba discuss alliance to save sharks

By: Jeff FranksSeptember 11, 2010Reuters team of U.S. scientists and environmentalists met with Cuban officials this week to discuss a proposed alliance, including Mexico, to protect the Gulf of Mexico’s declining shark population. The meetings were a product of both improved U.S.-Cuba relations and concern that only a joint effort by the three nations that … Continue reading U.S. and Cuba discuss alliance to save sharks

Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill’s 30-Year Legacy

Piece of tar mat cut from mangrove floor in July.Photo Credit: Wes Tunnell By Matthew BergerInternational Press ServiceSeptember 3, 2010 A surprisingly small number of scientists have studied the impacts of the oil spill resulting from the 1979 blowout at the Ixtoc I oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. Wes Tunnell, who first studied … Continue reading Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill’s 30-Year Legacy

FDA considers approving genetically modified salmon for human consumption

By Lyndsey LaytonThe Washington PostSeptember 6, 2010 The Food and Drug Administration is poised to approve the first genetically modified animal for human consumption, a highly anticipated decision that is stirring controversy and could mark a turning point in the way American food is produced. FDA scientists gave a boost last week to the Massachusetts … Continue reading FDA considers approving genetically modified salmon for human consumption