Marine Conservation Institute elects 3 eminent ocean conservationists as Directors

Marine Conservation Institute elects 3 eminent ocean conservationists as Directors Amy Mathews-Amos, Les Watling and John Davis join Board Sonoma County CA (August 17).  Today, in celebration of our oceans, Marine Conservation Institute President Lance Morgan announced the election of three new Directors.  They are: John B. Davis, President of Marine Affairs Research and Education
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Exploring America’s Unknown Grand Canyons

For most of us, guiding the pilots of submersibles or underwater robots to explore the deep sea is something we only hope to have the chance to experience in our lifetime. For Sandra Brooke, Marine Conservation Institute’s Director of Coral Conservation, it’s a core part of her work. On August 15, Sandra set sail on
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Marine Debris: Drowning in Trash

Killer Garbage in Our Oceans Earlier in July, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research vessel, the Oscar Elton Sette, pulled over 50 metric tons of marine trash from the waters of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, otherwise known as the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. NOAA’s marine debris operations manager Kyle Koyanagi lamented afterwards, “The
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From the UN to Dakar – seeing the connections firsthand

Jeff Ardron, Director of the Marine Conservation Institute high seas program, reports from Dakar, Senegal as part of his work within the United Nations processes to identify Ecologically and Biologically Significant Areas in the marine environment. (All photos by Jeff Ardron) The work of the United Nations sounds is important, but excruciatingly slow. Many ocean
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As Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Reaches Milestone, Continued Inaction Could Spell Disaster for Our Oceans

Earlier this week, we reached a troubling milestone as carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the Arctic atmosphere exceeded 400 parts per million (ppm).  Increased atmospheric CO2 has a devastating effect on our ocean ecosystems. As the chief regulator of climate, the ocean acts as a “carbon sink,” absorbing more than a quarter of the CO2humans
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