Marine Conservation Institute elects 3 eminent ocean conservationists as Directors

Marine Conservation Institute elects 3 eminent ocean conservationists as Directors Amy Mathews-Amos, Les Watling and John Davis join Board Sonoma County CA (August 17).  Today, in celebration of our oceans, Marine Conservation Institute President Lance Morgan announced the election of three new Directors.  They are: John B. Davis, President of Marine Affairs Research and Education … Continue reading Marine Conservation Institute elects 3 eminent ocean conservationists as Directors

Exploring America’s Unknown Grand Canyons

For most of us, guiding the pilots of submersibles or underwater robots to explore the deep sea is something we only hope to have the chance to experience in our lifetime. For Sandra Brooke, Marine Conservation Institute’s Director of Coral Conservation, it’s a core part of her work. On August 15, Sandra set sail on … Continue reading Exploring America’s Unknown Grand Canyons

Saving Our Sanctuaries: How You Can Help!

Great News! Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary will soon be undergoing some major changes. Originally the smallest of the national marine sanctuaries at just a quarter of a square mile (0.25 sq. mi.), new regulations adopted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) will add five reef and offshore areas, including Rose Atoll. These … Continue reading Saving Our Sanctuaries: How You Can Help!

Cruising Forward with Holland America Line!

Reflections from Michael Zwirn, Director of Development, on his recent trip to Seattle, Washington in support of Marine Conservation Institute’s partnership with Holland America Line.  On Saturday, July 28th, Marine Conservation Institute welcomed friends, donors, and members of our Board to a luncheon aboard the Holland America Line cruise ship ms Westerdam at port in … Continue reading Cruising Forward with Holland America Line!

Marine Debris: Drowning in Trash

Killer Garbage in Our Oceans Earlier in July, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research vessel, the Oscar Elton Sette, pulled over 50 metric tons of marine trash from the waters of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, otherwise known as the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. NOAA’s marine debris operations manager Kyle Koyanagi lamented afterwards, “The … Continue reading Marine Debris: Drowning in Trash

Debate on corals is broad, but too shallow

Corals have a future – we need to go deeper to see it  In his July 13, 2012 New York Times OpEd “A World Without Coral Reefs”, Roger Bradbury asserts that the world’s coral reefs are unsalvageable, the delicate ecosystems irreversibly devastated by overfishing, pollution, and ocean acidification. Following its publication, numerous blogs, opinion pieces, … Continue reading Debate on corals is broad, but too shallow

From the UN to Dakar – seeing the connections firsthand

Jeff Ardron, Director of the Marine Conservation Institute high seas program, reports from Dakar, Senegal as part of his work within the United Nations processes to identify Ecologically and Biologically Significant Areas in the marine environment. (All photos by Jeff Ardron) The work of the United Nations sounds is important, but excruciatingly slow. Many ocean … Continue reading From the UN to Dakar – seeing the connections firsthand

Capitol Hill Oceans Week: A Call to Action

Each year, Capitol Hill Ocean’s Week (CHOW) brings together government officials, private businesses, scientists, NGOs, and advocates for a week of lectures, discussions, and panels on various ocean policies, threats, laws, and other issues. This year, the theme, “One Nation, Shaped by the Sea,” served as a reminder to all of us of the interconnectedness … Continue reading Capitol Hill Oceans Week: A Call to Action

As Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Reaches Milestone, Continued Inaction Could Spell Disaster for Our Oceans

Earlier this week, we reached a troubling milestone as carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the Arctic atmosphere exceeded 400 parts per million (ppm).  Increased atmospheric CO2 has a devastating effect on our ocean ecosystems. As the chief regulator of climate, the ocean acts as a “carbon sink,” absorbing more than a quarter of the CO2humans … Continue reading As Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Reaches Milestone, Continued Inaction Could Spell Disaster for Our Oceans