On the Tide

The blog of Marine Conservation Institute

Pacific island nations step in to save tuna

San Francisco GateChristopher Pala, Chronicle Foreign ServiceSaturday, April 11, 2009 Until a group of small Pacific island nations imposed unheard-of restrictions on foreign fishing fleets in December, most tuna species were on the road to extinction, experts say. The measures are expected to reduce the catch of yellowfin, bigeye and albacore species by between 10 … Continue reading Pacific island nations step in to save tuna

Fish farms to fight back with EU help

BBC NewsBy Russell Padmore Europe business reporter, BBC News, Brussels At a time when stocks of some species of fish in the world’s oceans are dangerously low, the authorities in Brussels are concerned that Europe’s aquaculture sector has stagnated. Most of the seafood consumed within the EU is imported, but the Commissioner for Maritime Affairs … Continue reading Fish farms to fight back with EU help

Sonar Can Cause Temporary Deafness in Dolphins

The New York TimesBy HENRY FOUNTAIN Sonar has been implicated in some strandings of whales and dolphins, but the mechanism by which acoustic pings might cause disorientation is uncertain. Researchers at the University of Hawaii tested one possibility: that sonar can deafen marine mammals. T. Aran Mooney, now at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and … Continue reading Sonar Can Cause Temporary Deafness in Dolphins

NOAA Set for Larger Policy Role Under First Female Chief

By Juliet Eilperin Washington Post Staff WriterSaturday, March 21, 2009; Page A06 Jane Lubchenco, the newly confirmed head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, decided to dedicate her life to the sea 40 years ago when she became fascinated with a tiny species of mud-burrowing clam. Lubchenco, then an undergraduate at Colorado College, was … Continue reading NOAA Set for Larger Policy Role Under First Female Chief

Exxon Valdez oil-spill recovery still is work in progress, 20 years later

Twenty years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, pockets of oil — an estimated 16,000 gallons — remain buried in small portions of the intertidal zone. And herring, a cornerstone species of Prince William Sound’s ecosystem, is one of two species “not recovering.” The herring population’s failure to rebound has emerged as among the most … Continue reading Exxon Valdez oil-spill recovery still is work in progress, 20 years later

Setback for climate technical fix

By Richard Black Environment correspondent, BBC News website The biggest ever investigation into “ocean fertilisation” as a climate change fix has brought modest results. The idea is that putting iron filings in the ocean will stimulate growth of algae, which will absorb CO2 from air. But scientists on the Lohafex project, which put six tonnes … Continue reading Setback for climate technical fix