Tag Archives: Climate change

Taney Seamounts: Collapsed Calderas and New Species

Featured Pic: Chaunacops coloratus, a rare species of anglerfish discovered in 1891and filmed in the wild for the first time at the Taney Seamounts. Photo courtesy of NOAA. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   The Taney Seamounts are a chain of five seamounts spanning a distance of 33 miles across the seafloor off … Continue reading Taney Seamounts: Collapsed Calderas and New Species

Rodriguez Seamount – A Geologic Rarity

Featured Pic:  Pillow lava, a unique type of basalt rock that forms during underwater volcanic eruptions. Photo courtesy NOAA. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   Rodriguez Seamount is a 10–12 million-year-old seamount located approximately 42 miles off the coast of southern California. It towers over a mile above the seafloor, with its tallest … Continue reading Rodriguez Seamount – A Geologic Rarity

San Juan Seamount: An Ancient Archipelago

Featured Pic:  The remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Hercules explores the San Juan Seamount. Photo courtesy of Ocean Exploration Trust. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   San Juan Seamount Seamounts are massive underwater mountains – usually extinct volcanoes – that tower thousands of feet above the seafloor. Some seamounts however, including the San Juan … Continue reading San Juan Seamount: An Ancient Archipelago

Rose Atoll Abides

A Special Island in A Sea of Change

Ten years ago this month in January 2009, President George W. Bush designated a small island and coral reef system in American Samoa a marine national monument, called Rose Atoll. It is named so after its rosy pink corals. The monument protects 10,000 square miles of ocean from any commercial fishing or other extraction. Since … Continue reading Rose Atoll Abides

Pollution in the deep sea – are any habitats safe from human disturbance?

Feature Pic: A discarded aluminum can sits deep in the Channel Islands. Photo: MARE and NOAA   We’re all too familiar with the horrible images of once pristine beaches that are now covered with trash, threatening a wide array of charismatic animals including sea turtles, seabirds, and marine mammals. What about our ocean’s most remote … Continue reading Pollution in the deep sea – are any habitats safe from human disturbance?

Kelp Forests: Towering Coastal Wonders

By Siobhan Murphy, Marine Conservation Institute Communications Intern In our exploration of blue carbon so far, we’ve swum through dense mangrove forests and snorkeled over swaying seagrass meadows. Now, let’s head to cooler waters. Grab your wetsuit and dive with us into a towering kelp forest!     Kelps are large, typically brown seaweeds, of … Continue reading Kelp Forests: Towering Coastal Wonders

Leading the Effort to Ensure that Global Marine Protection Efforts Fulfill Global Promises

The global community is pushing forward on promises to achieve internationally agreed upon levels of environmental protection, and marine scientists are working diligently to evaluate the efficacy of these actions. Definitions are being refined, levels of protection are being researched, and “on the water” implementation is being evaluated. Marine Conservation Institute is leading this work … Continue reading Leading the Effort to Ensure that Global Marine Protection Efforts Fulfill Global Promises

MARCH FOR THE OCEAN

Why should you March For The Ocean on June 9? How will that help ocean ecosystems threatened by overfishing, climate change, plastic pollution and other issues? How can marches with even a hundred thousand people in over a dozen cities support healthier oceans? I often ask myself this question when an organization suggests a public … Continue reading MARCH FOR THE OCEAN

Seagrass: More than Meets the Eye

By Jessica Knoth, Marine Conservation Institute Intern & Photographer Underwater forests and meadows are not so different from their terrestrial cousins. In place of deer and small critters, fish dart among the submerged grass. Seals glide through the water, much like bears patrolling the woods, and kelp sways overhead instead of evergreens. Just as terrestrial plants … Continue reading Seagrass: More than Meets the Eye

5 Reasons Seamounts Matter

Seamounts are underwater mountains that rise from the seabed. Because most of the world’s seafloor is a muddy plain, seamounts are special deep-sea features that support unique creatures. Seamounts can arise along mid-ocean ridges, as isolated landmarks, or as volcanoes in chains and clusters. Off California, several seamounts were ancient islands that only went under … Continue reading 5 Reasons Seamounts Matter