Tag Archives: deep-sea ecosystems

Expedition Planning 101 – How Models Can Help Guide Deep-Sea Exploration

In May 2018, a joint Marine Conservation Institute and Marine Applied Research and Exploration (MARE) expedition will probe the deep seafloor within the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary. The sanctuary is home to an astonishing diversity of cold-water corals and sponges that build crucial habitat for a large number of fish and invertebrate species (e.g., … Continue reading Expedition Planning 101 – How Models Can Help Guide Deep-Sea Exploration

5 Reasons Seamounts Matter

Seamounts are underwater mountains that rise from the seabed. Because most of the world’s seafloor is a muddy plain, seamounts are special deep-sea features that support unique creatures. Seamounts can arise along mid-ocean ridges, as isolated landmarks, or as volcanoes in chains and clusters. Off California, several seamounts were ancient islands that only went under … Continue reading 5 Reasons Seamounts Matter

The Hunt for a Super Coral: Can Cold-Water Corals Adapt to Ocean Acidification?

When most people think of a coral reef they are imagining a sunny tropical beach, but many coral species are actually found in the dark, cold waters of the deep sea1. These corals, commonly known as cold-water corals due to their preference for low temperatures, form beautiful ecosystems that are teeming with life. One of … Continue reading The Hunt for a Super Coral: Can Cold-Water Corals Adapt to Ocean Acidification?

The deep sea holds secrets that need our protection

Deep sea environments have always been fascinating and mysterious to me. As a child, I would stay awake at night flipping through pages of Cousteau’s The Ocean World trying to understand how I could possibly experience and understand all that the ocean held. My children now flip through the pages of that same book with … Continue reading The deep sea holds secrets that need our protection