Tag Archives: NOAA

Who Needs the Deep-Sea, Anyway?

Featured Picture: Life is both weird and beautiful in the deep ocean. Here, a Schaefer’s Anglerfish (Sladenia shaefersi) uses modified fins to walk along the seafloor in search of prey. Photo courtesy of NOAA. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   The deep sea is so remote that many people are completely unaware of … Continue reading Who Needs the Deep-Sea, Anyway?

Let Them Eat Fish?

Featured Picture: A rockfish searches for a place to hide off the coast of Southern California. Photo courtesy of NOAA. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   The next time you order fish at a restaurant, pull out your phone for a second and research where it might have come from (Monterey Bay Aquarium’s … Continue reading Let Them Eat Fish?

Setting Sail: Exploring Seamount Habitats in the Pacific Remote Islands

Featured Pic: The Exploration Vessel (E/V) Nautilus. Photo courtesy of Ocean Exploration Trust. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute On August 25th, Marine Conservation Institute staff scientist Samuel Georgian will join a 22 day-long deep-sea research expedition onboard the E/V Nautilus. The cruise is collaborative effort with scientists and support from a wide array … Continue reading Setting Sail: Exploring Seamount Habitats in the Pacific Remote Islands

Sharks on Seamounts

By Nikki Harasta, Marine Conservation Institute Science Intern   Sharks are incredibly important components of many different marine ecosystems. Unfortunately, sharks often enter our consciousness only when a shark attack on a beachgoer makes the news. Take a closer look at the numbers however, and you’ll see that they’ve been given a bad rap. The … Continue reading Sharks on Seamounts

Taney Seamounts: Collapsed Calderas and New Species

Featured Pic: Chaunacops coloratus, a rare species of anglerfish discovered in 1891and filmed in the wild for the first time at the Taney Seamounts. Photo courtesy of NOAA. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   The Taney Seamounts are a chain of five seamounts spanning a distance of 33 miles across the seafloor off … Continue reading Taney Seamounts: Collapsed Calderas and New Species

Rodriguez Seamount – A Geologic Rarity

Featured Pic:  Pillow lava, a unique type of basalt rock that forms during underwater volcanic eruptions. Photo courtesy NOAA. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   Rodriguez Seamount is a 10–12 million-year-old seamount located approximately 42 miles off the coast of southern California. It towers over a mile above the seafloor, with its tallest … Continue reading Rodriguez Seamount – A Geologic Rarity

San Juan Seamount: An Ancient Archipelago

Featured Pic:  The remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Hercules explores the San Juan Seamount. Photo courtesy of Ocean Exploration Trust. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   San Juan Seamount Seamounts are massive underwater mountains – usually extinct volcanoes – that tower thousands of feet above the seafloor. Some seamounts however, including the San Juan … Continue reading San Juan Seamount: An Ancient Archipelago

Gumdrop and Pioneer Seamounts – Offshore Seabird Havens

Featured Pic: A breeding rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), one of the many seabird species that relies on the productive waters above Gumdrop and Pioneer Seamounts to forage. Photo courtesy of Mick Thompson (CC BY-NC 2.0). By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   Gumdrop and Pioneer Seamounts Gumdrop and Pioneer are neighboring seamounts located approximately 45 … Continue reading Gumdrop and Pioneer Seamounts – Offshore Seabird Havens

Cortes and Tanner Banks: Recreation and Biodiversity Hotspots

Featured Pic: Brown stony corals (Coenocyathus bowersi, foreground) and pink hydrocorals (Stylaster californicus, background) provide habitat for a large school of rockfish at Cortes Bank. Photo courtesy of NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute     Cortes and Tanner Banks Cortes and Tanner Banks are twin seamounts located approximately … Continue reading Cortes and Tanner Banks: Recreation and Biodiversity Hotspots

Gorda and Mendocino Ridges – California’s Test Cases for Deep-Sea Mining

Featured Pic: A diverse assemblage of benthic organisms on a sponge garden at Mendocino Ridge. Image courtesy of NOAA NWFSC. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute The Gorda and Mendocino Ridges are a complex series of oceanic ridges just off the coast of northern California, and are home to unique deep-sea ecosystems including hydrothermal … Continue reading Gorda and Mendocino Ridges – California’s Test Cases for Deep-Sea Mining