Tag Archives: NOAA

Taney Seamounts: Collapsed Calderas and New Species

Featured Pic: Chaunacops coloratus, a rare species of anglerfish discovered in 1891and filmed in the wild for the first time at the Taney Seamounts. Photo courtesy of NOAA. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   The Taney Seamounts are a chain of five seamounts spanning a distance of 33 miles across the seafloor off … Continue reading Taney Seamounts: Collapsed Calderas and New Species

Rodriguez Seamount – A Geologic Rarity

Featured Pic:  Pillow lava, a unique type of basalt rock that forms during underwater volcanic eruptions. Photo courtesy NOAA. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   Rodriguez Seamount is a 10–12 million-year-old seamount located approximately 42 miles off the coast of southern California. It towers over a mile above the seafloor, with its tallest … Continue reading Rodriguez Seamount – A Geologic Rarity

San Juan Seamount: An Ancient Archipelago

Featured Pic:  The remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Hercules explores the San Juan Seamount. Photo courtesy of Ocean Exploration Trust. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   San Juan Seamount Seamounts are massive underwater mountains – usually extinct volcanoes – that tower thousands of feet above the seafloor. Some seamounts however, including the San Juan … Continue reading San Juan Seamount: An Ancient Archipelago

Gumdrop and Pioneer Seamounts – Offshore Seabird Havens

Featured Pic: A breeding rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), one of the many seabird species that relies on the productive waters above Gumdrop and Pioneer Seamounts to forage. Photo courtesy of Mick Thompson (CC BY-NC 2.0). By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute   Gumdrop and Pioneer Seamounts Gumdrop and Pioneer are neighboring seamounts located approximately 45 … Continue reading Gumdrop and Pioneer Seamounts – Offshore Seabird Havens

Cortes and Tanner Banks: Recreation and Biodiversity Hotspots

Featured Pic: Brown stony corals (Coenocyathus bowersi, foreground) and pink hydrocorals (Stylaster californicus, background) provide habitat for a large school of rockfish at Cortes Bank. Photo courtesy of NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute     Cortes and Tanner Banks Cortes and Tanner Banks are twin seamounts located approximately … Continue reading Cortes and Tanner Banks: Recreation and Biodiversity Hotspots

Gorda and Mendocino Ridges – California’s Test Cases for Deep-Sea Mining

Featured Pic: A diverse assemblage of benthic organisms on a sponge garden at Mendocino Ridge. Image courtesy of NOAA NWFSC. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute The Gorda and Mendocino Ridges are a complex series of oceanic ridges just off the coast of northern California, and are home to unique deep-sea ecosystems including hydrothermal … Continue reading Gorda and Mendocino Ridges – California’s Test Cases for Deep-Sea Mining

Denizens of the Deep: Are Brittle Stars the Best House Guests?

Featured Pic: A colorful Ruby Brittle Star (Ophioderma rubicundum) in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Photo courtesy of NOAA. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute If you have ever seen a brittle star, you may have assumed that you were looking at the closely related starfish instead. Starfish and brittle stars are both members … Continue reading Denizens of the Deep: Are Brittle Stars the Best House Guests?

Denizens of the Deep: The Octopuses Who Make Their Homes on Seamounts

Featured Pic: A giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) observed on Cordell Bank during a Marine Conservation Institute and Marine Applied Research & Exploration (MARE) cruise off the coast of northern California. Photo credit: MARE and NOAA. By Samuel Georgian, Marine Biogeographer at Marine Conservation Institute Octopuses are seriously cool creatures. They can rapidly change the color … Continue reading Denizens of the Deep: The Octopuses Who Make Their Homes on Seamounts

Pollution in the deep sea – are any habitats safe from human disturbance?

Feature Pic: A discarded aluminum can sits deep in the Channel Islands. Photo: MARE and NOAA   We’re all too familiar with the horrible images of once pristine beaches that are now covered with trash, threatening a wide array of charismatic animals including sea turtles, seabirds, and marine mammals. What about our ocean’s most remote … Continue reading Pollution in the deep sea – are any habitats safe from human disturbance?

Deep But Not Deserted – Exploring Deep-Sea Ecosystems Off the California Coast

Feature Pic: A yellowtail rockfish swims past a pink landscape dominated by strawberry anemones and hydrocorals on Cordell Bank. Photo: MARE and NOAA In July 2018, Marine Conservation Institute staff scientist Samuel Georgian stepped on board the NOAA research vessel Bell M. Shimada, beginning a two-week expedition to explore deep-water coral and sponge habitats off … Continue reading Deep But Not Deserted – Exploring Deep-Sea Ecosystems Off the California Coast