Tag Archives: Seamounts

Seamounts medicine? Why your next antibiotic may come from the deep sea.

Feature pic: Octocoral, sponge, and feather star on the Davidson Seamount, by NOAA / MBARI. Our oceans are filled with amazing creatures, big and small. Most of its life is actually far smaller than we can see: there are millions of microscopic animals, plants, and more thriving in our oceans. Human lives may directly depend on these … Continue reading Seamounts medicine? Why your next antibiotic may come from the deep sea.

Status Watch: How Well Are Coral Reefs Protected Around the World?

Tropical coral reefs are some of the most diverse and productive ecosystems on our planet. Often called the ‘rainforests’ of our oceans, coral reefs host incredible levels of biodiversity and provide important ecosystem services that many organisms – including humans – rely on. Globally, coral reefs cover less than 0.1% of our seafloor, but provide … Continue reading Status Watch: How Well Are Coral Reefs Protected Around the World?

Expedition Planning 101 – How Models Can Help Guide Deep-Sea Exploration

In May 2018, a joint Marine Conservation Institute and Marine Applied Research and Exploration (MARE) expedition will probe the deep seafloor within the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary. The sanctuary is home to an astonishing diversity of cold-water corals and sponges that build crucial habitat for a large number of fish and invertebrate species (e.g., … Continue reading Expedition Planning 101 – How Models Can Help Guide Deep-Sea Exploration

5 Reasons Seamounts Matter

Seamounts are underwater mountains that rise from the seabed. Because most of the world’s seafloor is a muddy plain, seamounts are special deep-sea features that support unique creatures. Seamounts can arise along mid-ocean ridges, as isolated landmarks, or as volcanoes in chains and clusters. Off California, several seamounts were ancient islands that only went under … Continue reading 5 Reasons Seamounts Matter

Our 2018 Conservation Priorities

This year promises to be an interesting and exciting one for marine conservation, and we’re ready to meet its opportunities and challenges head-on for our oceans. We will continue advocating for strong protection of our oceans, strengthening our initiatives and working with you to safeguard marine biodiversity. Here’s a preview of our plans for this … Continue reading Our 2018 Conservation Priorities

The Future of the Deep Sea: Undiscovered Wonders at Risk

You’ve probably heard the saying that we know less about the deep ocean than we do about the surface of the moon. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, we have explored less than 5% of the ocean to date, so the saying is pretty accurate. However, as technology improves and scientists are able … Continue reading The Future of the Deep Sea: Undiscovered Wonders at Risk

Needle in a haystack: identifying vulnerable marine ecosystems in the deep sea

Seamounts are underwater mountains rising thousands of feet from the bottom of the ocean. Due to their size and shape, seamounts exert a strong influence on local currents that results in nutrient enrichment and increased food supply. As a result, these massive features are often highly productive ‘oases’ in the deep sea, supporting a large … Continue reading Needle in a haystack: identifying vulnerable marine ecosystems in the deep sea

Whales, Seamounts, and Fisherfolk: How Conservation Efforts are Attempting to Tackle a Growing Threat to Marine Life

Hidden beneath the waters off the California coast lies a treasure trove of marine biodiversity. Seamounts, or underwater mountains, are veritable hotspots for a wide variety of undersea critters who call deep-sea ecosystems home. These steep peaks often break up ocean currents, allowing for nutrients to be brought up from deeper waters,[1] supporting an incredible … Continue reading Whales, Seamounts, and Fisherfolk: How Conservation Efforts are Attempting to Tackle a Growing Threat to Marine Life

Getting to the bottom of the oceans’ tallest peaks

Our oceans are home to a number of globally rare habitats that marine animals rely on. These areas are often characterized by the presence of endemic species and are usually teeming with life. Unfortunately, the qualities that make these places unique also make them incredibly vulnerable. Seamounts—undersea mountains—have been at the center of recent conservation … Continue reading Getting to the bottom of the oceans’ tallest peaks

Saving Our Oceans

With our friends at National Geographic!

Marine Conservation Institute collaborated with partner photographer Brian Skerry to help create the cover story of the February issue of National Geographic Magazine: Saving Our Oceans. The article highlights some of the ocean’s most pristine places — like Cortes Bank seamount off the coast of California — and is brought to life with stunning photos taken by Brian Skerry … Continue reading Saving Our Oceans